ANONYMOUS BENEFACTOR


A College of Engineering undergraduate student works on his senior design project in a Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering department lab.

Drexel alumni who graduated in the 1960s have seen the former Drexel Institute of Technology grow into a university with a global reach and a leading engineering program.

One of these alumni has been inspired by Drexel’s expansion and the growth of its programs to include the University in his will to establish two endowed scholarships - one for students in the College of Engineering, and one for those in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems.

"I felt that a bequest would make the most of my success in life," says the donor, who wishes to remain anonymous. "My motivation was to make an impact on students to motivate them to contribute and to benefit society."

He holds bachelor’s and master's degrees from Drexel’s electrical engineering and biomedical engineering programs, and he credits the University with his success. He notes that the co-op program, in particular, allowed him to pay his way through school and graduate with the experience necessary to drive professional accomplishments.

"The person at a regular four-year school is not getting the full experience without a co-op," he says. "I worked for medical electronics and expanded my knowledge beyond engineering through biomed, and I was able to apply my skills to medical research pursuits. [The co-op] allows you to get into industry, work and produce."

Although the donor calls today’s Drexel "hardly recognizable" compared to the Drexel he knew, he says the qualities he finds most important remain unchanged.

A bequest for Drexel is a good investment in people who deserve support. The benefits spread far beyond what you’d be able to do on your own.
- ANONYMOUS BENEFACTOR

"The emphasis on the selection of the best students, placed in the right curriculum, who have the opportunity to go on co-op is still the same," he says. "You know the student next to you is just as motivated to succeed as you are."

These students are the reason why the donor made his generous gift to Drexel.

"You’re supporting potential," he says. "Some of the people who come out of Drexel could win the Nobel Prize."

By establishing endowed scholarships, the donor will enable Drexel students to reap the rewards of his generosity in perpetuity and increase their access to opportunities to succeed every year.

He urges other Drexel alumni to consider making a bequest gift of their own. Through a bequest, alumni, parents and friends are able to leave their legacy to Drexel in a way that is most meaningful to them and that helps safeguard the University’s future.

"A bequest for Drexel is a good investment in people who deserve support," he says. "The benefits spread far beyond what you’d be able to do on your own."


This state-of-the art wet lab in Drexel’s Papadakis Integrated Sciences Building is used year-round by students in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems.